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Southern Pacific Steam Power

Pictures on these pages are N scale models of the Southern Pacific Steam Locomotives I have.
Prototype basic historic informations are desumed from sources listed above.
If some of you found errors or have additional informations,
please contact me via e-mail, and I will provide page update and credits.

Last upd. Nov-2009

M Type Mogul 2-6-0
M #1806 (Model Power)

SP 2-6-0 CLASS M-21

Southern Pacific built the heaviest of all Moguls, using parts from retired 2-6-6-2 engines, at Houston from 1928 to 1930.
These engines were very powerful for their type but also very heavy.
After serving on SP main lines, they were sold to the SP de Mexico but were too heavy and carne back to the SP in the Los Angeles area.
When they were retired in favor of diesels, it was partly because they were too heavy to be sent to branchline service.

2·6·0 Mogul - Total engines: 355

Pacific Lines .............................................................. 252
Atlantic Lines ............................................................. 128
Mexican Lines ............................................................. 60

Southern Pacific was late to enbrace the 2-6-0 Mogul type, popular with many RR in the mid-nineteenth century, althoug Central Pacific owned some of the type in 1860s.
Southern Pacific Lines did not purchase large numbers of Moguls until the turn of the century- After the type had largely fallen out of favor.
More than 250 Moguls served the Pacific Lines. SP had several Mogul Vauclain compounds, a very unusual compound locomotive wheel arrangement.
Some SP Moguls survived until early 1950s

The 2-6-0's, though relatively small locomotives, were not widely used in early day operations.
The earliest ones built for the SP - those that were later classified in the M-4 group - were received in 1899.
The Southem Pacific Railroad had no 2-6-0's, the CentraI Pacific but six, of which five were rebuilt to 4-4-0's in 1870 and 1871. The oldest ones reaching the 1901 generaI renumbering were those built in the early 1880's for the Oregon & California.

The Pacific Lines series were 1600, 1700 and 1800, while the 2-6·0's of the Atlantic and Mexican Lines were numbered in the 400 and 500 series, except for the M-10's which for a while were numbered 685-699, and the M-21's, the country's heaviest 2-6-0's, which were renumbered to the 600 series in 1950.
While the Pacific Lines series at one time were very nearly complete, the situation was short-lived as many engines were transferred to the Atlantic system and a few to the Arizona Eastern, while in later years several were transferred to the Mexican operations.

Of the 355 engines of this type alI but the seven listed below have been scrapped:

1629 ....................................................................................... Sold to Gene Autry
1673 ................................................................... On display at Tucson, Arizona
1727 .......................................................... On display at Dunsmuir, California
1744 ....................................................................... On display at Corinne, Utah
1765...................................................................On display at Lomita,California
1771 ......................... not visible,to public, Old Sacramento shop, California
1774 ...................................................................... On display at Globe, Arizona
1785 ............................................................. On Display at Woodburn, Oregon

Source : A Century of SP Steam Locomotives - Guy L. Dunscomb.

Errata corrige : December 2011, I've received a mail from David O’Connor, member of Lomita Railroad Museum refering about the 1765.
"
Your website and the Southern Pacific Railroad records show the M6 Mogul 1765 as scrapped.  After it was sold for scrap in 1957 it sat in a Long Beach scrap yard for a few years.  It was bought by a Mrs. Lewis of Lomita California in the 1960’s to be center piece of a small railroad museum she built.  SP Mogul 1765 has been on display in Lomita since 1967 and as you can see from the photo it’s very popular with the next generation of train enthusiasts." 

I’ve enclosed a photo I took a few years ago ( click on picture to enlarge) :

The Lomita museum has a website: http://www.lomita-rr.org/ ,
and the SP 1765 page is at: http://www.lomita-rr.org/steam%20locomotive.htm

Errata corrige : First of all, I love your site and all of the info you have put together…thanks.
Was poking around today and saw that you still list SP 1771 (2-6-0) as being located in Placerville, CA. That locomotive now lives in the old SP Sacramento Shops where it is waiting to be rebuilt (as part of the CSRM collection and not visible to the public). It was moved in 1985 – traded for SP bay window caboose 1283 to be used as a visitors center (but the caboose wasn’t ever really used). 1771 was to be restored within 10 years according to the agreement…but wasn’t and won’t be any time soon. Still there is hope that maybe someday she will get put back together and run again.
Jeff Maurer - Sacramento Valley NTrak

Source for classification and historical info used

On Line References :

OFF Line References ( sometimes called "Books" ) :

  • A Century of SP Steam Locomotives - Guy L. Dunscomb
  • Southern Pacific Steam Pictorial - Guy l.Dunscomb, Donald K.Dunscomb, Robert A.Pecotich Vol.1 & Vol.2
  • SP Co. Steam Locomotive Compendium - Diebert & Strapac
  • Steam Locomotives Cyclopedia- Vol.1- Model railroader - Linn H.Westcott
  • Southern Pacific Steam Switchers of the Pacific Lines - Deimling, Gene
  • Volume 2 -- Southern Pacific Mogul 2-6-0 Pictorial - By Duane Karam Jr., Monte Vista Publishing

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Last update :
Nov 2009

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